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Summer Fields Crane Fly (detail), MB Haas

Wild Hastings photography exhibition at the station

Wild Hastings features the work of PhotoHastings members Rose Biela, Ian Grant, Marybeth Haas and Andrew Moran and is part of the 2018 PH season of events. Marybeth Haas shares her vision for curating this free and accessible exhibition at Hastings Rail Station on now until 31 January 2019.

Untitled 1, Andrew Moran

The exhibition was conceived as a celebration of the natural environments in which Hastings is situated. Hastings urban areas are surrounded and punctuated by stunning wild and green spaces which compliment the creative human activities of the town.

Some of these places, like the beaches, cliffs and woods of the country park and Old Roar Gill existed long before humans arrived while others, like public parks, allotments and suburban gardens, are in constant relationship with human activity. We are blessed in Hastings with ancient woodlands, miles of beaches, open green spaces and parkland, all teaming with wildlife.

Each artist created images in response to their feelings of connection with the local natural spaces and wild places that mean the most to them. The result is a range of expressive styles offering a rich and diverse celebration of the artists’ relationships with the natural beauty of Hastings.

Incantation, Ian Grant

Our busy lives can be so full of work, things to do and places to go that we forget about our rootedness in the Earth and how important it is to our and our children’s well being to actually spend time outdoors, in the elements, amongst trees and other living beings.

In current times, when the negative human environmental impact is becoming more obvious through pollution, climate change and species extinction, it can be so easy to despair; it is therefore all the more important to cultivate, celebrate and honour our connections with the other than human world.

I think we can’t be reminded often enough that for us humans to thrive, we need to be in reciprocal, interdependent relationship with the natural world and this can begin with appreciation and connection on a personal level, which is what Wild Hastings is about.

Distant Oak, Rose Biela

Each Wild Hastings artist found their own way to connect with the local wild around them, given their particular circumstances and limitations, and to express that through their photographic practice; my invitation is for others to also reflect on their personal connections with nature and to consider ways of deepening those connections, not only for personal benefit, for which there is overwhelming evidence (see links below) but also in aid of the collective planetary shift towards collaborative love and care of this precious planet and our fellow beings.

Exhibition runs until 31 January 2019. Email marybethhaas@ymail.com for access to the exhibition without a rail ticket.

Please share your exhibition feedback with a one-minute survey.

Wild Hastings has been generously supported by:
PhotoHastings, Southeastern Hastings Rail Station andLH colour narrow

 

Dripping Well, MB Haas

It’s official — spending time outside is good for you

Being outside can improve memory, fight depression, and lower blood pressure — here are 12 science-backed reasons to spend more time outdoors

How nature is good for our health and happiness

Other HOT articles by Marybeth Haas: Active Beach Love, Plastication Imagination: seafront exhibition

Posted 16:39 Wednesday, Dec 5, 2018 In: Photography

Also in: Photography


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